Tag Archives: Understanding

The Quad: Upon Reflection

My window overlooked the quad

But you couldn’t overlook the quad

Not with Kool and the Gang’s Ladies Night

Or Parliament’s Knee Deep

Bouncing off of the walls…the concrete

The tree with the painted on Kappa Diamond

The Quad

 

Where the likes of Ray-Ray, Face, Karen Sweets, Earl, and Snakey-O-Boy threw down

The swelling crowd told to push back

We had some here but we needed some more

I can still hear the Zeta bells ringing in the air

I can still imagine destination rising to the sky

While wide-eyed freshmen dreamed of the day of joining the circle

The Quad

 

The place to stand

As you contemplated going to the SUB…to class…the library…or to simply stand still

Allowing LU to fill you

The place to find out what movie was playing in Ware

To bum a quarter for the party

To throw game at a person of interest…gotta move fast…weekend’s coming

The Quad

Quad2

At year’s end

With boxes and bags

Dragging heavy loads from one dorm to another

A new home

A new experience

But still the Quad serves as the familiar

The place to gather once settled…to begin anew

The Quad

 

Then, following Commencement

Walking from the gym in your cap and gown

For the last official tie

To pass through and onto the future

Looking forward

To another encounter

With the Quad

 

End

Guy A. Sims is a PROUD Lincoln University graduate (Class of 1983).  He is the author of the novel, Living Just A Little, and the crime novellas, The Cold Hard Cases of Duke Denim.  He is also the head writer of the Brotherman: Dictator of Discipline comic book series and the Brotherman graphic novel, Revelation

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tim Wise: Cultural Provocateur by Guy A. Sims

Tim Wise

Tim Wise

Tim Wise began his comments at Virginia Tech with a caveat…a bit of clarification…perhaps even a spoonful of keepin’ it realism.  No surprise…what he came to deliver was not anything different from the messages people of color have been sharing, promoting, explaining, and demanding in classrooms, boardrooms, cubicles, and neighborhoods.  Only this time it was presented in a package a little more palatable than what may have been the norm.  It was akin to a parent no longer giving their child Castor Oil in a spoon but now it is in a gelcap.  Same medicine…just easily swallowed.  The goal, to massage the words of Malcolm X, was to administer the medicine by any means necessary.

Mr. Wise, if you’re not familiar, is an anti-racism activist, an author, lecturer, and cultural provocateur (I added that one myself, we’ll get to that one later).  His books, White Like Me, Dear White America, and (hold on for this one) Speaking Treason Fluently Anti-Racist Reflections From An Angry White Male speak to address, illuminate, and dismantle structures of white privilege, cultural mis-education, false notions of power, and the head-on challenge of having serious and action-oriented conversations on equity and diversity.

On this evening, like many of his presentations, Tim Wise was speaking primarily to his white brethren and sisterens.  A deep rooted son of the south, Tim peeled back the onion of history, of Americana mythology, of institutional practices of divisiveness, and the mental shackles that bind us all.  His peeling, slow and easy, doesn’t produce tears.  His delivery, complete with self and cultural-effacing humor and rife with majority-generated information for the data-driven doubter, brought a paced and steady rise of discomfort for many in the audience.  Tuned in observers may have noticed that numbers of people of color present served as the choir, offering their call and response to this guest preacher in the House of Diversity & Equity Elevation.

Tim Wise challenged misrepresented rhetoric presented in the form of mainstream logic when addressing Black Lives Matter, immigration issues, and deadly police interactions with people of color.  He challenged those unable to connect racialized issues of today as another troubled link in the history of race relations in the United States. He challenged the very core of belief systems that define how people view their place as human beings.

Tim Wise and Guy Sims

Tim Wise and Guy Sims

As a cultural provocateur, Mr. Wise stirred the senses and notions of those in attendance.  At times it was uneasy to laugh, to agree, to look at your neighbor, or even at yourself.  I asked him at the conclusion of his visit did he feel he was getting any traction with his message.  He said on the grand scale, maybe not.  But individually, people who say their lives and thinking have been changed…yes.  The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.  The journey of a better world begins with one person.

Guy A. Sims is the author of the forthcoming Brotherman graphic novel, Revelation. He is also the author of the romantically romance novel, Living Just A Little, and the crime novellas, The Cold Hard Cases of Duke Denim.     Contact or comment at guysims.com or @guysims6 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,